Unless Georgia runoff election goes to the Democrats, the election killed any dreams of big health care changes

The likelihood of a Biden presidency and a closely divided Senate means that nothing big is likely to happen in health care for at least the next two years. For all the time Democrats spent debating Medicare for All, competing public insurance options and sweeping federal controls over drug prices, the near-term future for health…

COVID-19 Impact on Outpatient Care: Visits Return to Pre-pandemic Levels, but Not for All Providers and Patients

Outpatient visits have returned to their pre-pandemic levels after declining by nearly 60%, according to a Commonwealth Fund new analysis. The huge drop in people seeking care was bad both for providers and for patients, many of whom delayed care for conditions that may have worsened. Telemedicine visits initially surged, but have since dropped off.…

The U.S. spends twice as much as comparable countries on health, driven mostly by higher payments to hospitals and physicians, NOT drugs!

Even though voters care a lot about drug prices, they’re NOT the main reason the U.S. spends so much on health care. The primary culprits are the twice as much per person spent on hospital and physician payments than comparable wealthy nations. And yet, according to a new Peterson-Kaiser Tracker analysis, the U.S. has worse health…

Medicare’s finances got much worse in the last couple of years, foreshadowing tough choices for the new government!

The latest Medicare projections from the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) show the extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic has hurt Medicare’s financial outlook, and foreshadow the tough choices facing the next President and Congress. According to CBO’s estimates, Medicare’s Hospital Insurance Trust Fund will have insufficient funds to cover all benefit costs beginning in 2024…