Congress Has a Deal to End the Most Obnoxious Practice in American Medicine. Will Mitch McConnell Kill It?

On Friday evening, Democrats and Republicans in Congress unexpectedly announced they had reached a deal on legislation aimed at stopping surprise medical bills, one of the most widely loathed and predatory features of the American health care system. The breakthrough came after nearly two years of wrangling on Capitol Hill, amid an enormous lobbying battle that pitted insurers and…

KFF: Potential Health Policy Administrative Actions Under President Biden

President-elect Joe Biden campaigned on supporting and building upon the Affordable Care Act (ACA), better managing the coronavirus pandemic and lowering prescription drug costs. However, with the political balance of the Senate uncertain, some Biden proposals, like creating a new public option and lowering the Medicare age to 60, are less likely to be enacted.…

The dawn of digital medicine: The pandemic is ushering in the next trillion-dollar industry

When it comes to digitisation, health care has lagged significantly behind most other industries (banking but travel, retail, car making and even packaged goods). Some 70% of American hospitals still fax and post patient records! By exposing such digital deficiencies, the pandemic is at last spurring change. Confronted with shutdowns and chaos, doctors have embraced…

Unless Georgia runoff election goes to the Democrats, the election killed any dreams of big health care changes

The likelihood of a Biden presidency and a closely divided Senate means that nothing big is likely to happen in health care for at least the next two years. For all the time Democrats spent debating Medicare for All, competing public insurance options and sweeping federal controls over drug prices, the near-term future for health…

COVID-19 Impact on Outpatient Care: Visits Return to Pre-pandemic Levels, but Not for All Providers and Patients

Outpatient visits have returned to their pre-pandemic levels after declining by nearly 60%, according to a Commonwealth Fund new analysis. The huge drop in people seeking care was bad both for providers and for patients, many of whom delayed care for conditions that may have worsened. Telemedicine visits initially surged, but have since dropped off.…